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Tropical storm Barry bringing heavy rains to the Mississippi Valley

Tropical storm Barry is projected to make landfall sometime Saturday along the Louisiana coast. As of right now Barry is still officially a tropical storm (wind speed 39 to 73 miles per hour) but has the potential to become a hurricane by Saturday (wind speed 74 mph and above).weat

Barry is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 10 to 20 inches over southeast Louisiana and southwest Mississippi, with isolated maximum amounts of 25 inches. These rains are expected to lead to dangerous, life-threatening flooding over portions of the central Gulf Coast into the lower Mississippi Valley. Over the remainder of the lower Mississippi Valley, total rain accumulations of four to eight inches are expected, with isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches.

Arkansas tomato growers are expected to receive more than two inches of rain on Sunday. Missouri watermelon growers are not expected to receive more than 0.75 inches of rain on Monday. This small amount of rain is not expected to affect the harvest or quality of watermelon in this region. Tomato growers in Alabama and Tennessee have the possibility to received isolated showers of more than two inches.

PEAK HEAT OUT WEST WILL BE TOMORROW
The worst days of this heat wave will be today through Monday. The hottest day with either be Saturday or Sunday depending upon location.

These extreme hot temps have the possibility to cause quality issues with many commodities, including wet veg in the southern end of the Salinas Valley where max temps will get about 90 for five consecutive days. Peak heat will be Sunday with a high of 95.

Coachella Valley grape growers will see four consecutive days of 117. Melons growers in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to have five consecutive days over 100, with a peak of 107 tomorrow.

HEAT RETURNS TO MICHIGAN STARTING MONDAY
Starting Monday Michigan growing regions will see at least six consecutive days of max temps above 90, with a peak of 95 on Saturday, July 20. There is no rain anticipated for at least the next 10 days.

These temperatures are approximately 10 degrees above normal for July.

The Weathermelon app offers consolidated lists of global growing regions for each commodity; a 10-day detail forecast for each region; current radar maps (U.S. only); estimated harvest start/end dates for each commodity; monthly average high/low temps for each region; and custom daily alerts for temperature, precipitation and severe weather based on 10-day forecasts.

(David Robidoux is a co-founder Weathermelon)