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Side Delights supports Mediterranean-style diet for mental health benefits

It is well known that a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables is a good way for people to improve their physical health, but new research shows that it may actually improve their mental health as well.side

The link to diet and depression has become an increasingly hot topic following the American Psychiatric Association’s 2019 annual meeting in San Francisco, where medical experts presented research showing that the Mediterranean-style diet, associated with a reduced risk of cancer and longevity, may also help protect against depression.

At the meeting, Konstantinos Argyropoulos claimed that people who adhere to a Mediterranean diet are less likely to develop symptoms of depression later on in life. The Mediterranean diet, which U.S. News & World Report calls the diet a "well-balanced eating plan," suggests that for optimum health, consumers should adopt new dietary guidelines: no grains, no dairy, less sugar, more healthy fats, medium amounts of protein, and most importantly, lots of vegetables.

“Potatoes have been known as America’s favorite vegetable for decades, and as research continues to build on the health advantages of vegetable-heavy eating plans, consumers are embracing filling, flavorful ways to incorporate vegetables into more meals,” said Kathleen Triou, president and chief executive officer of Fresh Solutions Network. “Potatoes have a high-satiety factor and are extremely versatile, making them the perfect addition to a vegetable-based diet plan that can not only improve overall health but can help relieve depression.”

A recent article in Healthline about treating depression and anxiety with a vegetable-based diet cited two studies supporting the claims. In the first study, after clinically depressed participants ate a modified Mediterranean diet for three months, their symptoms were significantly better. In the other study, Spanish researchers found people who closely followed the Mediterranean lifestyle were 50 percent less likely to develop depression than those who didn’t.

Another Healthline article dedicated to the health benefits of potatoes points out that they are rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants; can help with weight-loss by curbing hunger pains and cravings, and are naturally gluten-free.